Author Archives: Ron Unger

About Ron Unger

I am a licensed clinical social worker and therapist who works with people diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, using a respectful and skill building approach called cognitive therapy for psychosis. I also talk and teach seminars related to this approach. You can read more about me and about how I became interested in this field by going to my blog, recoveryfrompsychosis.org, and clicking on the tab "about Ron Unger."

Resources for Learning to Provide Therapy for Psychosis

It’s now widely recognized that therapy can be helpful for psychosis. But there is still a lot of confusion around what type of therapy approach is helpful, and especially about how professionals can find training by experts in how to … Continue reading

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Healing the Parts in Our Internal Worlds

When we go into severe mental health crisis, it can feel like a civil war inside, with various voices, demons, or other entities engaged in battle with each other. When the chaos is great, the idea that we might ever … Continue reading

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Paradoxes of Madness and Philosophy

Have you ever met people who reported that “asking too many questions” was what seemed to have led them into madness? Or maybe you noticed yourself that the more you looked into the deeper aspects of existence, the more paradoxical, … Continue reading

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Why Does Treatment for Psychosis Sometimes Hurt More Than It Helps?

While the experience of psychosis can be highly distressing, many who recover report that the treatment was often worse than the psychosis itself. What is it that goes so wrong with treatment, and what could we do to improve efforts … Continue reading

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Rethinking “Delusions”: Envisioning a Humanistic Approach to Troublesome Beliefs

When people are told they have “psychosis,” it’s usually because they are experiencing one or both of the following: “hallucinations,” defined as sensations that don’t seem to have any physical cause, and “delusions,” defined as beliefs that don’t agree with … Continue reading

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Finding Meaning in States Some Call Mad

When we relate with each other, a key thing we long for is to have the other see meaning in our experience, while we notice and reflect on the meaning in theirs. But when people are seen to be “mad” … Continue reading

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Don’t React – Choose How to Relate to Distressing Voices!

“Don’t React – Choose How to Relate to Distressing Voices!”  is the subject of a webinar that was presented by Dr. Mark Hayward on 6/20/19. (See the link to the complete recording below.) This webinar presents a very practical way … Continue reading

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Recovery Versus Mad Pride: Exploring the Contradictions

I’ve been intrigued by the way the battle against mental health system oppression has drawn on two important and powerful ideas – which happen to contradict each other! One is the idea that people can “recover” from mental health problems.  … Continue reading

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Helping People To Constructively Engage With Voices

When people have problems with voices, the most common recommendation they are given is to try to avoid them – to take drugs to make them stop, to simply ignore them, to use distraction, or similar approaches. But these strategies … Continue reading

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Starting with Immediate Experience: A Presentation by Isabel Clarke

What would it look like if mental health providers were trained to be both deeply humanistic, AND very efficient at helping people identify and cope with the issues at the core of whatever their difficulties might be, including psychosis? It … Continue reading

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